Thursday, October 1, 2015

Weekly Spotlight on Literary Events: October 2nd-8th



Jim Dutcher and Jamie Dutcher - A Friend for Lakota: The Incredible True Story of a Wolf Who Braved Bullying
Friday, October 2nd at 10:30 am
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
(Children’s and Teens’ Dept)
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008

The Dutchers lived in a tent near a wolf pack to observe their behavior and watched the story of Lakota unfold. The lowest-ranking member of his pack, this pup endured repeated bullying until he discovered a friend who provided the support he needed. Ages 5 – 8. Free admission.

Robert B. Reich - Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few
Friday, October 2nd at 7 pm
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008

Reich’s distinguished career spans three administrations, including tenure as Clinton’s secretary of labor. He has been awarded the Vaclav Havel Foundation Prize for work in economic and social thought, and is the author of a dozen books, most recently Beyond Outrage. He is also the co-founding editor of American Prospect, co-creator of the film Inequality for All, commentator on NPR’s Marketplace, and professor of public policy at UC Berkeley. In his thirteenth book, Reich tackles the growing problem of economic disparity by focusing on the relationship between politics and corporate finance. Closely examining the revolving door between the two, Reich compares myths about both the minimum wage and top corporate compensation, and issues a call for civic action to change the status quo. Free admission.

Fall for the Book - Jacob Appel and T. Dasu
Friday, October 2nd at 7 pm
The Writer’s Center
4508 Walsh Street
Bethesda, MD 20815

The Writer’s Center hosts a Fall for the Book Festival reading by Jacob Appel and T. Dasu. The reading will be followed by a reception and book signing. Free admission.
Joby Warrick - Black Flags: The Rise of Isis
Saturday, October 3rd at 1 pm
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008                   

In his second book, Warrick, the Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post journalist and author of The Triple Agent, follows up his suspenseful story of Jordanian al-Qaeda agent Humam Khalil al-Balawi with this equally dramatic chronicle of the rise of ISIS. Examining events and beliefs but most of all the actions of one man, Warrick tracks the rise of the extremist group by following Abu Musab al-Zarqawi beginning with his release in 1999 from a Jordanian prison through his consolidation of power when the U.S. invaded Iraq in 2003, on to his leadership of al-Qaeda in Iraq, now known as ISIS. Free admission.

The Cities We Live In: New Writing from South Asia
A program in two parts
Saturday, October 3 at 2 pm
The Writer’s Center
4508 Walsh Street
Bethesda, MD 20815
Part 1: Experiencing the City:  public space and gender (2:00 to 3:30 p.m.)
Readers: Kavita Daiya is Associate Professor of English and Affiliated Faculty in the Women’s Studies Program and Global Women’s Institute at George Washington University, Washington DC. Tula Goenka is an author, filmmaker, educator and human rights activist. Rashmi Sadana is the author of English Heart, Hindi Heartland: The Political Life of Literature in India (University of California Press, 2012), which is an ethnography of Delhi's literary field and the politics of language that undergird it. Leeya Mehta has worked in international development for two decades, most recently with the World Bank's gender group.

Part II: Fiction from South Asia: A Conversation with A.X. Ahmad and Sujata Massey (3:45 – 5:15 P.M.)
Amin Ahmad, as ‘A.X. Ahmad’, is the author of two books—The Caretaker (2013) and The Last Taxi Ride (2014), both suspense novels from St. Martin’s Press. Sujata Massey was born in England to parents from India and Germany. She grew up mostly in the United States, graduated from the Johns Hopkins University, and worked as a newspaper journalist in Baltimore before turning to fiction. Free admission.

Yeonmi Park - In Order To Live: A North Korean Girl's Journey to Freedom
Saturday, October 3rd at 3:30 pm
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008

Park grew up in North Korea, but didn’t realize the extent of the nation’s privation and repression until her father, a civil servant, was arrested for smuggling. The family soon lost its relatively privileged status and, facing starvation, Park and her mother escaped to the South. Her memoir is a harrowing account of the long journey through China and Mongolia at the mercy of human traffickers. Today, Park is a human rights advocate and a leader of young Korean dissidents. Free admission.

Youth Open Mic
Saturday, October 3rd from 4 pm to 6 pm
Busboys and Poets (Shirlington location)
4251 South Campbell Avenue
Arlington, VA 22206

Youth-focused and youth-led, Youth Open Mic is a monthly series that features student poets, singers, musicians, and actors from the DC/Maryland/Virginia area. Middle school and high school students are encouraged to come share their art in our supportive, progressive, artistic atmosphere. $5 cover.

David O. Stewart - The Wilson Deception
Saturday, October 3rd at 6 pm
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008

Stewart, an award-winning historian who has written studies of James Madison, Aaron Burr, and the seminal political events of The Summer of 1787, made his fiction debut with The Lincoln Deception, a novel offering a new and plausible theory of the 16th president’s assassination. In his second novel he revisits the Paris Peace Conference in December 1918, where spies, heroes, diplomats, and others maneuver for position amid at least one assassination attempt and a raging flu epidemic. Free admission.

Stuart Stevens - The Last Season: A Father, a Son, and a Lifetime of College Football
Sunday, October 4th at 1 pm
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008

A founder of the Stevens & Schriefer Group, Stevens is a seasoned political consultant as well as a widely published journalist and a writer for TV shows such as “K Street” and “Northern Exposure.” In his fifth book, Stevens looks back to 2012, a year when professional disappointment caused him to reflect on the bedrocks of his life: his father and college football. Chronicling the season he and his ninety-five-year-old father spent attending Ole Miss games together, Stevens’s book offers readers vivid sports writing along with a moving testimonial to family and to the renewal of bonds between an aging father and a middle-aged son. Free admission.

Nancy Naomi Carlson and Tanya Olson
Sunday, October 4th from 2 pm to 4 pm
The Writer’s Center
4508 Walsh Street
Bethesda, MD 20815

Emerging Writer Fellowship recipient Tanya Olson reads from Boyishly, her collection of poems. She is joined by Nancy Carlson, who reads from recently published translations, Abdourahman Waberi’s The Nomads, My Brothers, Go Out to Drink from the Big Dipper, and Calazaza's Delicious Dereliction by Suzanne Dracius. The reading will be followed by a reception and book signing. Free admission.

Sparkle Open Mic Poetry hosted by Regie Cabico and Danielle Evennou
Sunday, October 4th from 8 pm to 10 pm
Busboys and Poets (14th & V location)
2021 14th St, NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

*SPARKLE* Open Mic Poetry is a queer-friendly and focused reading series that has featured an array of LGBT-dedicated poets. $5 cover.

Ben Hatke - Little Robot
Monday, October 5th at 10:30 am
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008

In this graphic novel for early readers, a young girl exploring the junkyard near her trailer happens upon a robot as diminutive as she is. After using her mechanical skills to bring it to life, she and her new friend experience a series of small adventures—until an enormous factory robot comes to take Little Robot away. Ages 6 – 9. Free admission.

Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely - All American Boys
Monday, October 5th at 6 pm
Bethesda Public Library
7400 Arlington Road
Bethesda, MD 20814

Rashad and Quinn are high school classmates whose lives are changed when Brendan’s white police-officer guardian suspects Rashad, who is black, of shoplifting from the neighborhood bodega and beats him to a pulp. Quinn cannot reconcile the man he knows with the violence he witnesses firsthand—but after Rashad begins missing school, both teens are forced to confront realities they never wanted to face. Ages 15 and up. Free admission.

Elisabeth Egan - A Window Opens and Laura Dave – Eight Hundred Grapes
Monday, October 5th at 6:30 pm
Kramerbooks
1517 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC 20036

In A Window Opens, beloved books editor at Glamour magazine Elisabeth Egan brings us Alice Pearse, a compulsively honest, longing-to-have-it-all, sandwich generation heroine for our social-media-obsessed, lean in (or opt out) age. When her husband makes a radical career change, Alice is ready to lean in—and she knows exactly how lucky she is to land a job at Scroll, a hip young start-up which promises to be the future of reading. The Holy Grail of working mothers—an intellectually satisfying job and a happy personal life—seems suddenly within reach. 

In Eight Hundred Grapes, this breakout novel from an author who "positively shines with wisdom and intelligence" (Jonathan Tropper, This Is Where I leave You), Laura Dave "writes with humor and insight about relationships in all their complexity, whether she's describing siblings or fianc├ęs or a couple long-married. Eight Hundred Grapes is a captivating story about the power of family, the limitations of love, and what becomes of a life's work." (J. Courtney Sullivan, Maine) Free admission.

Stephanie Steinberg, Sara Fitzgerald, Andy Kroll, and Leslie Wayne - In The Name Of Editorial Freedom
Monday, October 5th at 6:30 pm
Busboys and Poets (Brookland location)
625 Monroe St. NE
Washington, D.C. 20017

An editor at U.S. News and World Report, Stephanie Steinberg, like many other award-winning journalists at premier news outlets across the world, got her start on The Michigan Daily. Founded in 1890 and still thriving, with a print circulation of some 18,000, The Michigan Daily is much more than a student newspaper, as this collection (titled after the paper’s longstanding masthead) demonstrates. Joining Steinberg to discuss the Daily’s important work are three of her fellow alums, including Sara Fitzgerald, who went on to write for major news organizations including The Washington Post; Andy Kroll, who is currently a political correspondent for National Journal; and Leslie Wayne, professor at Columbia University's School of Journalism and  former reporter for The New York Times.

Sarah Weinman - Women Crime Writers: Eight Suspense Novels of the 1940s & 50s
Monday, October 5th at 6:30 pm
Busboys and Poets (Takoma location)
235 Carroll St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20012

If you were a mystery fan in the 1940s and ‘50s, you’d likely have been reading books by Vera Caspary, Helen Eustis, and Dorothy B. Hughes, among others. They were great then; they’re classic now, and, along with works by Elisabeth Sanxay Holding, Charlotte Armstrong, Patricia Highsmith, Margaret Millar, and Dolores Hitchens, are newly available in this two-volume box set. Weinman, editor of these volumes, is also the author of the online newsletter, The Crime Lady, as well as articles for publications including The New York Times Magazine and The Guardian. Weinman will be in conversation with Allison Leotta, a former federal prosecutor and author of four mysteries, most recently A Good Killing. Free admission.

Niall Ferguson - Kissinger: 1923-1968: The Idealist
Monday, October 5th at 7 pm
GW Lisner Auditorium
730 21st St NW
Washington, DC 20052

In Kissinger: 1923-1968: The Idealist, the first of his projected two-volumes on Henry Kissinger, Ferguson delves into the statesman’s early life and thinking, providing the little-known background that formed this influential figure’s world view. Fleeing Hitler, Kissinger spent his first years in New York doing factory work before the draft sent him into action at the Battle of the Bulge. Post-war studies at Harvard immersed him in the ideas of Kant and Metternich, setting him on course to becoming the strategist we know. Ferguson traces his subject’s intellectual coming-of-age with a depth and scope that recalls his magisterial work on Siegmund Warburg, The High Financier, and his comprehensive investigation of The House of Rothschild. This event is part of The Newsmakers Series, a partnership of Politics & Prose and George Washington University that moves beyond the headlines to spark in-depth conversations about contemporary issues. 1 Ticket: $15; 1 Book and 1 Ticket: $40; $38 for P & P members; 1 Book and 2 Tickets: $45; $43 for P & P members.

Wendell Pierce - The Wind in the Reeds: A Storm, a Play, and the City That Would Not Be Broken
Monday, October 5th at 7 pm
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008

Pierce, star of The Wire and an Emmy-award-winning producer, was born in New Orleans, where his family still lives in the Pontchartrain Park area. His book, co-written with Rod Dreher, a columnist, critic, and author of Crunchy Cons, is a heartfelt memoir that both mourns the losses of Hurricane Katrina and the subsequent civil chaos and celebrates the spirit that has sustained his family and many others as they’ve worked steadily over the last ten years to rebuild their devastated neighborhoods. Free admission.

Ben Hatke - Little Robot
Monday, October 5th at 7:30 pm
Takoma Park Library
101 Philadelphia Ave
Takoma Park, MD 20912

In this graphic novel for early readers, a young girl exploring the junkyard near her trailer happens upon a robot as diminutive as she is. After using her mechanical skills to bring it to life, she and her new friend experience a series of small adventures—until an enormous factory robot comes to take Little Robot away. Ages 6 – 9. Free admission.

Monday Night Open Mic Poetry hosted by KaNikki J
Monday, October 5th from 8 pm to 10 pm
Busboys and Poets (Shirlington location)
4251 South Campbell Avenue
Arlington, VA 22206

For two hours, audiences can expect a diverse chorus of voices and a vast array of professional spoken word performers, open mic rookies, musicians, and a different host every week. $5 cover.

Monday Night Open Mic hosted by E-Baby
Monday, October 5th from 9 pm to 11 pm
Busboys and Poets (Brookland location)
625 Monroe St. NE
Washington, D.C. 20017

For two hours, audiences can expect a diverse chorus of voices, and a vast array of professional spoken word performers, open mic rookies, musicians, and a different host every week. $5 cover.

Race in America Today: a Panel Discussion with April Ryan, Paul Butler, Michael Eric Dyson, and Joy-Ann Reid
Tuesday, October 6th at 6:30 pm
Busboys and Poets (14th & V location)
2021 14th St, NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

Join April Ryan for a discussion of race in relation to politics, the news, and American culture, past and present—with special focus on the recent rise in racial incidents, their origins, and possible solutions. Ryan will moderate a panel of distinguished writers including: Paul Butler, a former federal prosecutor, and currently a law professor at George Washington University; Michael Eric Dyson, Georgetown professor of sociology, and author of sixteen books; and Joy-Ann Reid, MSNBC correspondent, managing editor of TheGrio.com, and author of Fracture. Free admission.
John Deferrari - Capital Streetcars: Early Mass Transit in Washington, D.C.
Tuesday, October 6th at 6:30 pm
Busboys and Poets (Brookland location)
625 Monroe St. NE
Washington, D.C. 20017
In his third book-length foray into local history, DeFerrari, “Secrets of Washington” blogger and author of Lost Washington D.C. and Historic Restaurants of Washington D.C., looks back to the golden age of the area’s streetcars. First up and running during the Civil War, the city’s original streetcars were horse-drawn. As the vehicles grew more powerful, the network expanded, giving urbanites easy access to suburban sites like Glen Echo. Free admission.
Marlon James - A Brief History of Seven Killings
Tuesday, October 6th at 6:30 pm
Kramerbooks
1517 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC 20036

In A Brief History of Seven Killings, Marlon James combines brilliant storytelling with his unrivaled skills of characterization and meticulous eye for detail to forge an enthralling novel of dazzling ambition and scope. James will be in conversation with Tayla Burney, producer at WAMU’s The Kojo Nnamdi Show. Free admission.

Steven Lee Myers - The New Tsar: The Rise and Reign of Vladimir Putin
Tuesday, October 6th at 7 pm
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
Currently covering national security issues for The New York Times, Steven Lee Myers has been with the paper for more than twenty-five years. Prior to serving as Baghdad bureau chief, he was based in Russia for seven years and witnessed first-hand Putin’s consolidation of power. Buttressing this experience with extensive research, Myers charts Putin’s transition from KGB agent to, first, a reformist intent on establishing order and prosperity, then to an increasingly ruthless authoritarian at home and aggressive imperialist abroad.
Matt Davies - Nerdy Birdy
Tuesday, October 6th at 7 pm
Takoma Park Library
101 Philadelphia Ave
Takoma Park, MD 20912
Nerdy Birdy is a small-winged, glasses-wearing, allergic-to-birdseed guy who just wants to be like the cool birds. When he discovers a whole group of avian companions just like him, however, he thinks he’s found the true meaning of friendship— until a new girl arrives and calls everything into question. Ages 4 – 8. Free admission.
Tuesday Night Open Mic hosted by Twain Dooley
Tuesdays, October 6th from 9 pm to 11 pm
Busboys and Poets (14th & V location)
2021 14th St, NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

A Busboys and Poetry event! For two hours, audiences can expect a diverse chorus of voices, and a vast array of professional spoken word performers, open mic rookies, musicians, and a different host every week. $5 cover.

Tuesday Night Open Mic hosted by Rebecca Dupas
Tuesday, October 6th from 9 pm to 11 pm
Busboys and Poets (Takoma location)
235 Carroll St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20012

For two hours, audiences can expect a diverse chorus of voices, and a vast array of professional spoken word performers, open mic rookies, musicians, and a different host every week.
Tam O'Shaughnessy - Sally Ride: a Photobiography of America's Pioneering Woman in Space
Wednesday, October 7th at 10:30 am
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008

Although it may seem incredible now, Sally Ride was once known to her high school classmates as an underachiever. Little did they know that she would go on to play competitive tennis, obtain a doctorate in physics, and become the first American woman to travel to outer space. Tam O’Shaughnessy uses ample photographs and documents from family archives to tell her partner’s story.  Ages 10 – 14. Free admission.

Carol McCabe – The Autobiography of Alice Dunnigan
Wednesday, October 7th form 12 pm to 1 pm
Library of Congress
James Madison Building (Pickford Theater – Third floor)
101 Independence Ave SE
Washington, DC 20540

Author and Editor Carol McCabe Booker will discuss and sign the new edition of Alone atop the Hill: The Autobiography of Alice Dunnigan, Pioneer of the National Black Press. Free admission.

Marion Nestle - Soda Politics: Taking On Big Soda (And Winning)
Wednesday, October 7th at 6:30 pm
Busboys and Poets (14th & V location)
2021 14th St, NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

One of the country’s leading experts on health and food policy, Dr. Nestle, currently NYU’s Paulette Goddard professor, has been instrumental in establishing nutrition guidelines with the American Cancer Society, the DHS, and the FDA Food Advisory Committee and Science Board. In her ninth book, Nestle  confronts the soda industry. With products that cost nearly nothing to make and companies investing huge amounts on marketing, Nestle helps consumers fight back by publicizing soda’s contribution to obesity, diabetes, dental problems, and more. Free admission.

Howard Axelrod - The Point of Vanishing: A Memoir of Two Years in Solitude
Wednesday, October 7th at 6:30 pm
Busboys and Poets (Takoma location)
235 Carroll St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20012

Axelrod, who currently teaches at Grub Street in Boston, has contributed to publications including The New York Times Magazine and the Shambhala Sun. But his first book is an account of his retreat from all that; charting a process of physical and spiritual healing, this memoir begins with an injury that left him blind in one eye and ends with the insight Axelrod gained from living alone for two years in the Vermont woods where he focused on strengthening his remaining vision and considering questions of perception and meaning. Free admission.

Rachel B. Glaser - Paulina and Fran and Amber Sparks - May We Shed These Human Bodies
Wednesday, October 7th at 6:30 pm
Kramerbooks
1517 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC 20036

Paulina and Fran is a story of friendship, art, sex, and curly hair: an audaciously witty debut tracing the pas de deux of lust and love between two young, uncertain, conflicted art students. May We Shed These Human Bodies peers through vast spaces and skies with the world's most powerful telescope to find humanity: wild and bright and hard as diamonds. Here is humanity building: families reconstruct themselves, mothers fashion babies from two-by-fours and nails, boys make a mother out of leaves and twigs and wishes. Here is humanity tearing down: a wife sets her house on fire in revenge, a young girl plots to kill the ghosts that stalk her, a dying man takes the whole human race with him. Here is humanity transforming: feral children, cannibalistic seniors, animal wives—a whole sideshow's worth of oddballs and freaks. Free admission.

Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely - All American Boys
Wednesday, October 7th at 6:30 pm
Shaw Public Library
1630 7th St NW
Washington, DC 20001

Rashad and Quinn are high school classmates whose lives are changed when Brendan’s white police-officer guardian suspects Rashad, who is black, of shoplifting from the neighborhood bodega and beats him to a pulp. Quinn cannot reconcile the man he knows with the violence he witnesses firsthand—but after Rashad begins missing school, both teens are forced to confront realities they never wanted to face. Ages 15 and up. Free admission.

Lindsay Smith - Dreamstrider
Wednesday, October 7th at 7 pm
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
(Children’s and Teens’ Dept)
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008

Livia belongs to the underclass of the Barstadt Empire, doomed to spend her life doing menial labor that benefits the well-born citizens who live above ground. A chance meeting with a kind professor, however, changes everything. He befriends Livia and teaches her to become a Dreamstrider, someone who inhabits and controls the bodies of sleeping people. With her newfound gift, Livia becomes a spy for the Empire. When the once-defeated Nightmare begins to threaten Barstadt yet again, Livia’s talents become more important—and more dangerous—than ever. Ages 13 and up. Free admission.

Roberta Kaplan - Then Comes Marriage: United States v. Windsor and the Defeat of DOMA
Wednesday, October 7th at 7 pm
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008

Together for more than four decades, Edie Windsor and Thea Spyer were married in Canada in 2007, a union not recognized by the U.S. when Spyer died in 2009. Kaplan, a partner at Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, saw Windsor’s case as the perfect vehicle for defeating the Defense of Marriage Act. Her book, written with Lisa Dickey, a Washington journalist who also collaborated with Susan McDougal and Pat Harris on The Woman Who Wouldn’t Talk, recreates Kaplan’s preparation for bringing the case before the Supreme Court, relives the oral arguments, and also fleshes out the lives of those intimately involved in the issues. Kaplan will be in conversation with Indira Lakshmanan, a senior correspondent for Bloomberg News. Free admission.

Tam O'Shaughnessy - Sally Ride: a Photobiography of America's Pioneering Woman in Space
Wednesday, October 7th at 7:30 pm
Takoma Park Library
101 Philadelphia Ave
Takoma Park, MD 20912

Although it may seem incredible now, Sally Ride was once known to her high school classmates as an underachiever. Little did they know that she would go on to play competitive tennis, obtain a doctorate in physics, and become the first American woman to travel to outer space. O’Shaughnessy uses ample photographs and documents from family archives to tell her partner’s story.  Ages 10 – 14. Free admission.

Wednesday Open Mic Poetry hosted by Holly Bass
Wednesday, October 7th from 9 pm to 11 pm
Busboys and Poets (5th and K location)
1025 5th St NW
Washington, DC 20001

For two hours, audiences can expect a diverse chorus of voices and a vast array of professional spoken word performers, open mic rookies, musicians, and a different host every week. $5 cover.

Soman Chainani - The School for Good and Evil #3: The Last Ever After
Thursday, October 8th at 10:30 am
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008

The final installment of Chainani’s trilogy opens with former friends Agatha and Sophie on opposite sides of an epic battle. While Agatha returns to their hometown of Gavaldron, Sophie remains with the beautiful but nefarious School Master Rafal. Under Rafal’s command, leagues of fairy-tale villains are fighting to change the endings of their stories so that they become the victors. It’s up to Sophie, Tedros, and the League of Thirteen—a group of aged classic protagonists from Cinderella to Merlin—to make sure they don’t succeed.  Ages 9 – 12. Free admission.

Brian Turner in conversation with Ron Charles
Thursday, October 8th from 7 pm to 9 pm
Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital   
921 Pennsylvania Avenue, S.E.
Washington, DC 20003

Poet and essayist Brian Turner discusses his work with Ron Charles, editor of The Washington Post’s Book World. Free admission.
                                                                                            
Melanne Verveer - Fast Forward: How Women Can Achieve Power and Purpose
Thursday, October 8th at 7 pm
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008

Verveer and co-author Kim K. Azzarelli, established Seneca Point Global, an organization built on the recognition “that women are fast emerging as one of the most powerful and influential demographics” in the world. Verveer, appointed in 2009 as the State Department’s first Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues, is herself an example of what well-connected professional women can achieve, and she has interviewed some fifty dynamic and innovative women for this empowering look at how women are building on their economic might in order to change the world. Free admission.

Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely - All American Boys
Thursday, October 8th at 7 pm
Politics & Prose Bookstore and Coffeehouse
(Children’s and Teens’ Dept)
5015 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008

Rashad and Quinn are high school classmates whose lives are changed when Brendan’s white police-officer guardian suspects Rashad, who is black, of shoplifting from the neighborhood bodega and beats him to a pulp. Quinn cannot reconcile the man he knows with the violence he witnesses firsthand—but after Rashad begins missing school, both teens are forced to confront realities they never wanted to face. Ages 15 and up. Free admission.

Ben S. Bernanke - The Courage to Act: a Memoir of a Crisis and its Aftermath
Thursday, October 8th at 7 pm
Sixth and I Historic Synagogue
600 I St NW
Washington, DC 20001

A Princeton economics professor before joining Washington policy makers in 2002, Ben Bernanke was appointed chair of the Federal Reserve in 2006, a position he held until 2014. Coinciding with the Great Recession, Bernanke’s tenure put him at the heart of the crisis. His memoir, The Courage to Act, recreates these urgent years as Bernanke recounts working with two presidents and two treasury secretaries as well as drawing on all the resources of the Federal Reserve to contain the financial crisis. A testament to leadership, this book offers a unique look at the complex American economy. 1 Ticket: $20; 1 Book and 1 Ticket: $35; $33 for P & P members; 1 Book and 2 Tickets: $45; $42 for P & P members

Thursday Night Open Mic hosted by Two Deep
Thursday, October 8th from 9 pm to 11 pm
Busboys and Poets (Hyattsville location)
5331 Baltimore Avenue
Hyattsville, MD 20781

For two hours, audiences can expect a diverse chorus of voices, and a vast array of professional spoken word performers, open mic rookies, musicians, and a different host every week. $5 cover.


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