Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Spotlight on Literary Events August 2017

August 1st 6:30 PM
Kramerbooks
1517 Connecticut Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Washington Post reporter Dan Zak discusses his book Almighty, which covers the history and politics of the United States’  relationship to atomic power. From the race to create the bomb to today’s concerns of nuclear proliferation and the threat of a nuclear terror attack, Almighty covers the highs and lows of the United States and its most dangerous weapon.

 Zak will discuss his book and nuclear issues with Denise Kiernan, journalist and author of The Girls of Atomic City. 

August 2nd 7 PM
Politics and Prose
5015 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20008

Tracy Crow and Jerri Bell, both female former military officers, discuss their book on the history of women’s contribution to the United States’ armed forces. Their book sees through the eyes of women on the field to give voice to the trials and successes of American women in war. With accounts taken firsthand from memoirs, letters, diaries and oral histories, this is a new telling of an otherwise incomplete history. 

August 6th 2 PM
The Writer’s Center
4508 Walsh Street, Bethesda, MD 20815

The Writer’s Center welcomes Undiscovered Voices Fellowship winner Margaret Sessa-Hawkins, novelist Keith Fentonmiller, writer Donald Illich and author CL Bledsoe for a night of reading from their works. Featured readings will come from Illich’s recent chapbook, The Art of Dissolving, from Katzen Mutzenmacher’s Cursed Hat and from other works.

August 6th 7 PM
Busboys and Poets
1025 5th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

Award-winning journalist Michael Deibert presents his work on Haiti’s recent history. From two decades of reporting on Haiti, Deibert composes an insightful analysis of Haitian hope and heroism in pursuit of the construction of their own nation. 

August 8th, 6:30 PM
Busboys and Poets
235 Carroll Street NW, Washington, DC 20012

Kyle Dargan, the Director of Creative Writing at American University, Tiphanie Yanique, award winning author and professor at The New School, and Sheri Booker, winner of an NAACP image award, are featured readers at this presentation of work from the Hurston/Wright foundation’s summer workshop.

 August 8th 7 PM
Politics and Prose
5015 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20008

Gillian Thomas, a senior attorney for the ACLU Women’s Rights Project, will read from and discuss her new work on the fight for women’s rights in the workplace. Thomas looks through the lens of ten civil rights cases brought by women in order to receive the rights guaranteed to them by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The book exposes lesser known heroines in the struggle for women’s rights.  

August 10th 6:30 PM
Kramerbooks
1517 Connecticut Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Erik Love, associate professor of sociology at Dickinson College, presents his exploration of civil rights advocacy and its weaknesses. Love finds startling holes in American civil rights protections and the systems that allow survivors of hate crimes, prejudice and social exclusion to fight for their rights. 

August 13th 2 PM
The Writer’s Center
4508 Walsh Street, Bethesda, MD 20815

The Writer’s Center welcomes Marita Rivera to present a reading by participant poets of the Mariposa Writer’s Retreat, which she leads. 

August 14th 7 PM
Politics and Prose
5015 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20008

Anne Petersen offers an approachable analysis of the way a few celebrity women act to push the boundaries of what it means to be an “acceptable” woman. From Kim Kardashian to Hilary Clinton, Petersen uses her expertise in celebrity culture to define an increasingly common form of feminine power.

August 20th 2 PM
The Writer’s Center
4508 Walsh Street, Bethesda, MD 20815

Award winning contributors and editors of The Little Patuxent Review gather to present work from recent issues. Readers will include the widely published Ann Bracken, Clarinda Harris, Jean Kim and Steven Levya. 

August 27th 5 PM
Politics and Prose
5015 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20008


Professor of Humanities at Columbia University, Mathew Lilla, talks with Vox Interview writer Sean Illing about his new work on the failure of identity politics as the basis of left-wing political strategy. Lilla argues that progressives must embrace solidarity and encourage policies that will help all Americans. A continuation of the ideas in his New York Times op-ed, The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics offers a new way forward for the Democratic Party.